Success Stories 2

When I list a campaign on the Board Game Badger, I reach out to the publisher to ask them a single question: “What are you doing right in this campaign?” Regardless of whether the publisher meets the funding goal, it is important that we realize real people are working very hard to make games for us. I hope to humanize their campaigns a little in this way.

Demo the Prototype

“We’ve continued to demo our game at local game stores and events. We’ve had people who played Dragon Dodge and then backed it right away. Not only that, some of them have posted very positive comments on the campaign, which helps build credibility and confidence in the quality of the game. It’s also nice to get out there and keep interacting with people; it serves as a reminder that even though this project means a lot to us personally, we’re on Kickstarter because we want to create a great product for our backers.”
Maggie Stewart, Hidden Creek Games


Alluring Promises

“When we launched this Kickstarter, we set an aggressive delivery date because we want to get the game into hands of backers ASAP. We are loving the feedback in the campaign and doing our best to incorporate as many of the fans’ suggestions as possible without compromising game balance or our delivery time.”
Joshua Lobkowicz, Grey Fox Games


Proper Planning

“The most important part of a Kickstarter page in our opinion is making sure the page layout is clean. What we mean by that is everything flows well, and the graphics look professional. Even before the Kickstarter campaign began, we made sure to pick an artist who could produce artwork which popped and appeared playful. It’s a combination of proper planning and clean execution.”
Gavin Chan, Lazy Wolf Games


Deluxe Content

“First of all, paying for professional artwork and graphic design. Furthermore, offering people the choice between a basic edition and a deluxe edition, with metal coins, wooden spices and 6 cm long plastic miniature ships!”
Martin Looij, Keep Exploring Games


Build a Fanbase

“The success of the Black Orchestra campaign is basically down to the game standing out as a unique and well-crafted experience that people have already been enjoying. So the approach to the campaign is to just present the game clearly in a location where more people can discover it while doing all we can for existing fans.”
Chris McMullen, Game Salute


Commit

“I think the best thing I have done in this campaign is loving what I do and this universe! I put all my heart into this project, and even if I don’t have all I shall like to have! I give all I have!”
Florian Nampont, Wonderlands Project


Increase Efficiency

“What I am doing right is not making my goal as high as I did before. I cut down on costs on everything besides the quality of the game. I am an indie, so no one knows me. I am going to have to take a hit for this first game, but it’s something I’ve wanted to get out there for five years now, so I will be thrilled to see people playing the produced game on their table.”
Greg Breault, Rocket Slug Games



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Daniel Zayas

Daniel Zayas is owner and curator of this website. He has been ranking Kickstarter game campaigns via the Board Game Badger for three years. Daniel runs a consultant business via this website as well. Feel free to reach out to him in the links below.

4 comments

  1. It is really cool to hear some of these stories straight from the creators, and it’s interesting that they are each at a different stage in the journey. The lessons definitely seem to change over time.

  2. I want to design my own board game some day and it is really cool to hear from some that have already walked that path

  3. Some really good kickststarters in this list!

  4. Some very great advice from all of these creators!

What do you think?