Guest Blog with Petter Olsen – Do I Have Enough Followers?

Sorry for the hiatus! It’s been a busy few weeks. I have both helped launch two Kickstarter campaigns, Infinities: Defiance of Fate and Castles of Caleira, as well as attended two industry conventions, New York Toy Fair and Expedition Prototype and Industry Con (EPIC). In that time I let The Good, The Bad, and the Misinformed slip a couple of weeks, so for that, I apologize and promise to start up again as soon as possible.

In this time, I have talked to numerous creators about their strategies on Kickstarter, and one of those creators was none other than Petter Olsen. Petter is mid-campaign for his game, Donning the Purple, but took time to explain a bit about how he is best able to determine social clout and how that relates to his Kickstarter conversions.

You can support Petter by backing Donning the Purple, on Kickstarter now.

Your Crowd Size

So how do you know when are you ready to launch your campaign on Kickstarter? That depends on a lot of factors. In this article, I’m going to talk about one of those factors: Your crowd size.

Once your budget is in order, you probably know how many backers you minimum will need to fund your project. In this example, let’s say you need 300 backers.

It is crucial that you bring your audience to Kickstarter, but how do you know when your crowd is at the correct size to even think about having a launch date? Sadly, the social media world is not a place where one fan on your Facebook page equals one backer.

Spreadsheets

To help answer the crowd size question, I always start by placing my social media following across the web into a spreadsheet. I also put in my conversion rate for each platform from my prior campaigns as well as traffic to my website where I blog regularly. Tracking where your blog audience is coming from is a very powerful metric for new creators who do not have a campaign yet.

The conversion rates that I have may be different than yours, so put in the numbers that fit with your marketing results. Remember the numbers are dependent on how active you are on each platform. It takes a lot of time and effort to create engagement among your followers.

Conversion Probability

So how does this work? At the moment, I have 781 fans on the Facebook page. I think that I can get approximately 5 percent of those fans to back my campaign based on the history of my analytics data. That means I will get conservatively 39 backers who are also my Facebook fans. Then I do this on Twitter, Instagram, BGG and other social media accounts I manage. I also include the members of any relevant groups I admin. Each one of these has different conversion rates. The place where I get most response and backers from is my email list. They are active and responsive, so I calculate I will have a 10 percent conversion rate from the list members.

In the end, I add up all the converted backer numbers, and if that total is near my target goal backer count, I know I have enough to launch.

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